PHP to EGP Rate Chart

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PHP Popular Exchange Rates(today)

Exchange Rate Last day
PHP to GBP rate 0.01494 ▼
PHP to EUR rate 0.01697 ▼
PHP to AUD rate 0.02751 ▼
PHP to CAD rate 0.02495 ▼
PHP to USD rate 0.01839 ▼ 0.018406
PHP to NZD rate 0.02958 ▼
PHP to TRY rate 0.35219 ▼ 0.35241
PHP to DKK rate 0.12638 ▼ 0.1265
PHP to AED rate 0.0675 ▼
PHP to NOK rate 0.19192 ▲ 0.1918
PHP to SEK rate 0.19137 ▼ 0.1913
PHP to CHF rate 0.0169 ▼
PHP to JPY rate 2.43841 ▼ 2.4404
PHP to HKD rate 0.14437 ▼ 0.1444
PHP to MXN rate 0.33314 ▼ 0.3328
PHP to SGD rate 0.02446 ▼
PHP to ZAR rate 0.33335 ▼ 0.3333

Economic indicators of Philippines and Egypt

Indicator Philippines Egypt
Real Private Consumption 4,199,818
Mil. 2018 PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2022 Q4
-
Private Consumption 3,890,831
Mil. PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2019 Q4
-
Investment 1,265,058
Mil. PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2019 Q4
-
Real GDP 2,654,444
Mil. 2000 PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2019 Q4
-
Nominal GDP 5,282,837
Mil. PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2019 Q4
-
Consumer Price Index (CPI) 121.4
Index 2018=100, NSA, Monthly; Feb 2023
-
Producer Price Index (PPI) 98.03
Index 2018=100, NSA, Monthly; Jan 2023
-
Unemployment Rate 4.77
%, NSA, Monthly; Jan 2023
-
Exports of Goods 4,044
Mil. USD, NSA, Monthly; Dec 2022
-
Imports of Goods 9,600
Mil. USD, NSA, Monthly; Dec 2022
-
Net Exports -513,324
Mil. PHP, NSA, Quarterly; 2019 Q4
-
Lending Rate 4.75
% p.a., NSA, Daily; 31 Dec 2018
17.25
% p.a., NSA, Daily; 24 Mar 2023
Consumer Confidence -14.57
Index, NSA, Quarterly; 2022 Q4
-
Retail Sales 3,174,377
Tons, NSA, Quarterly; 2020 Q4
-

PHP to EGP Historical Rates(table)

Date Open Highest Lowest Close
PHP to EGP (2023-03-30) 0.5659 0.5671 0.5671 0.5652
PHP to EGP (2023-03-29) 0.5671 0.5677 0.5699 0.5656
PHP to EGP (2023-03-28) 0.5667 0.5696 0.5701 0.5658
PHP to EGP (2023-03-27) 0.5696 0.5685 0.5717 0.5662
PHP to EGP (2023-03-24) 0.5682 0.5697 0.5708 0.5673
PHP to EGP (2023-03-23) 0.5698 0.5682 0.5708 0.5663
PHP to EGP (2023-03-22) 0.5669 0.5698 0.5699 0.5633
PHP to EGP (2023-03-21) 0.5679 0.5688 0.5707 0.5676
PHP to EGP (2023-03-20) 0.5675 0.5659 0.5694 0.5634
PHP to EGP (2023-03-17) 0.5616 0.5631 0.5640 0.5627
PHP to EGP (2023-03-16) 0.5598 0.5618 0.5644 0.5607
PHP to EGP (2023-03-15) 0.5605 0.5610 0.5648 0.5606
PHP to EGP (2023-03-14) 0.5603 0.5612 0.5642 0.5592
PHP to EGP (2023-03-13) 0.5609 0.5610 0.5650 0.5605
PHP to EGP (2023-03-10) 0.5589 0.5601 0.5606 0.5590
PHP to EGP (2023-03-09) 0.5590 0.5583 0.5610 0.5574
PHP to EGP (2023-03-08) 0.5568 0.5576 0.5587 0.5538
PHP to EGP (2023-03-07) 0.5571 0.5604 0.5608 0.5562
PHP to EGP (2023-03-06) 0.5595 0.5615 0.5616 0.5577
PHP to EGP (2023-03-03) 0.5615 0.5602 0.5622 0.5600
PHP to EGP (2023-03-02) 0.5583 0.5570 0.5594 0.5538

PHP to EGP Handy Conversion

1 PHP = 0.566 EGP
2 PHP = 1.132 EGP
3 PHP = 1.698 EGP
4 PHP = 2.264 EGP
5 PHP = 2.83 EGP
6 PHP = 3.395 EGP
7 PHP = 3.961 EGP
8 PHP = 4.527 EGP
9 PHP = 5.093 EGP
10 PHP = 5.659 EGP
15 PHP = 8.489 EGP
20 PHP = 11.318 EGP
25 PHP = 14.148 EGP
50 PHP = 28.295 EGP
100 PHP = 56.59 EGP
200 PHP = 113.18 EGP
250 PHP = 141.475 EGP
500 PHP = 282.95 EGP
750 PHP = 424.425 EGP
1000 PHP = 565.9 EGP
1500 PHP = 848.85 EGP
2000 PHP = 1131.8 EGP
5000 PHP = 2829.5 EGP
10000 PHP = 5659 EGP

Comparison between Philippines and Egypt

Background comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt

The Philippine Islands became a Spanish colony during the 16th century; they were ceded to the US in 1898 following the Spanish-American War. In 1935 the Philippines became a self-governing commonwealth. Manuel QUEZON was elected president and was tasked with preparing the country for independence after a 10-year transition. In 1942 the islands fell under Japanese occupation during World War II, and US forces and Filipinos fought together during 1944-45 to regain control. On 4 July 1946 the Republic of the Philippines attained its independence. A 20-year rule by Ferdinand MARCOS ended in 1986, when a "people power" movement in Manila ("EDSA 1") forced him into exile and installed Corazon AQUINO as president. Her presidency was hampered by several coup attempts that prevented a return to full political stability and economic development. Fidel RAMOS was elected president in 1992. His administration was marked by increased stability and by progress on economic reforms. In 1992, the US closed its last military bases on the islands. Joseph ESTRADA was elected president in 1998. He was succeeded by his vice-president, Gloria MACAPAGAL-ARROYO, in January 2001 after ESTRADA's stormy impeachment trial on corruption charges broke down and another "people power" movement ("EDSA 2") demanded his resignation. MACAPAGAL-ARROYO was elected to a six-year term as president in May 2004. Her presidency was marred by several corruption allegations but the Philippine economy was one of the few to avoid contraction following the 2008 global financial crisis, expanding each year of her administration. Benigno AQUINO III was elected to a six-year term as president in May 2010 and was succeeded by Rodrigo DUTERTE in May 2016.

The Philippine Government faces threats from several groups, some of which are on the US Government's Foreign Terrorist Organization list. Manila has waged a decades-long struggle against ethnic Moro insurgencies in the southern Philippines, which has led to a peace accord with the Moro National Liberation Front and ongoing peace talks with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. The decades-long Maoist-inspired New People's Army insurgency also operates through much of the country. In 2017, Philippine armed forces battled an ISIS-Philippines siege in Marawi City, driving DUTERTE to declare martial law in the region. The Philippines faces increased tension with China over disputed territorial and maritime claims in the South China Sea.

The regularity and richness of the annual Nile River flood, coupled with semi-isolation provided by deserts to the east and west, allowed for the development of one of the world's great civilizations. A unified kingdom arose circa 3200 B.C., and a series of dynasties ruled in Egypt for the next three millennia. The last native dynasty fell to the Persians in 341 B.C., who in turn were replaced by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines. It was the Arabs who introduced Islam and the Arabic language in the 7th century and who ruled for the next six centuries. A local military caste, the Mamluks took control about 1250 and continued to govern after the conquest of Egypt by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Completion of the Suez Canal in 1869 elevated Egypt as an important world transportation hub. Ostensibly to protect its investments, Britain seized control of Egypt's government in 1882, but nominal allegiance to the Ottoman Empire continued until 1914. Partially independent from the UK in 1922, Egypt acquired full sovereignty from Britain in 1952. The completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1971 and the resultant Lake Nasser have reaffirmed the time-honored place of the Nile River in the agriculture and ecology of Egypt. A rapidly growing population (the largest in the Arab world), limited arable land, and dependence on the Nile all continue to overtax resources and stress society. The government has struggled to meet the demands of Egypt's population through economic reform and massive investment in communications and physical infrastructure.

Inspired by the 2010 Tunisian revolution, Egyptian opposition groups led demonstrations and labor strikes countrywide, culminating in President Hosni MUBARAK's ouster in 2011. Egypt's military assumed national leadership until a new parliament was in place in early 2012; later that same year, Mohammed MORSI won the presidential election. Following often violent protests throughout the spring of 2013 against MORSI's government and the Muslim Brotherhood, the Egyptian Armed Forces intervened and removed MORSI from power in July 2013 and replaced him with interim president Adly MANSOUR. In January 2014, voters approved a new constitution by referendum and in May 2014 elected former defense minister Abdelfattah ELSISI president. Egypt elected a new legislature in December 2015, the first parliament since 2012. ELSISI was reelected to a second four-year term in March 2018.

Geography comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Location

Southeastern Asia, archipelago between the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea, east of Vietnam

Northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula

Geographic coordinates

13 00 N, 122 00 E

27 00 N, 30 00 E

Map references

Southeast Asia

Africa

Area

total: 300,000 sq km

land: 298,170 sq km

water: 1,830 sq km

country comparison to the world: 74

total: 1,001,450 sq km

land: 995,450 sq km

water: 6,000 sq km

country comparison to the world: 31

Land boundaries

0 km

total: 2,612 km

border countries (4): Gaza Strip 13 km, Israel 208 km, Libya 1,115 km, Sudan 1,276 km

Coastline

36,289 km

2,450 km

Maritime claims

territorial sea: irregular polygon extending up to 100 nm from coastline as defined by 1898 treaty; since late 1970s has also claimed polygonal-shaped area in South China Sea as wide as 285 nm

exclusive economic zone: 200 nm

continental shelf: to the depth of exploitation

territorial sea: 12 nm

contiguous zone: 24 nm

exclusive economic zone: 200 nm or the equidistant median line with Cyprus

continental shelf: 200 nm

Climate

tropical marine; northeast monsoon (November to April); southwest monsoon (May to October)

desert; hot, dry summers with moderate winters

Terrain

mostly mountains with narrow to extensive coastal lowlands

vast desert plateau interrupted by Nile valley and delta

Elevation

mean elevation: 442 m

elevation extremes: lowest point: Philippine Sea 0 m

highest point: Mount Apo 2,954 m

mean elevation: 321 m

elevation extremes: lowest point: Qattara Depression -133 m

highest point: Mount Catherine 2,629 m

Natural resources

timber, petroleum, nickel, cobalt, silver, gold, salt, copper

petroleum, natural gas, iron ore, phosphates, manganese, limestone, gypsum, talc, asbestos, lead, rare earth elements, zinc

Land use

agricultural land: 41%

arable land 18.2%; permanent crops 17.8%; permanent pasture 5%

forest: 25.9%

other: 33.1% (2011 est.)

agricultural land: 3.6%

arable land 2.8%; permanent crops 0.8%; permanent pasture 0%

forest: 0.1%

other: 96.3% (2011 est.)

Irrigated land

16,270 sq km (2012)

36,500 sq km (2012)

Population - distribution

population concentrated where good farmlands lie; highest concentrations are northwest and south-central Luzon, the southeastern extension of Luzon, and the islands of the Visayan Sea, particularly Cebu and Negros; Manila is home to one-eighth of the entire national population

approximately 95% of the population lives within 20 km of the Nile River and its delta; vast areas of the country remain sparsely populated or uninhabited

Natural hazards

astride typhoon belt, usually affected by 15 and struck by five to six cyclonic storms each year; landslides; active volcanoes; destructive earthquakes; tsunamis

volcanism: significant volcanic activity; Taal (311 m), which has shown recent unrest and may erupt in the near future, has been deemed a Decade Volcano by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior, worthy of study due to its explosive history and close proximity to human populations; Mayon (2,462 m), the country's most active volcano, erupted in 2009 forcing over 33,000 to be evacuated; other historically active volcanoes include Biliran, Babuyan Claro, Bulusan, Camiguin, Camiguin de Babuyanes, Didicas, Iraya, Jolo, Kanlaon, Makaturing, Musuan, Parker, Pinatubo, and Ragang

periodic droughts; frequent earthquakes; flash floods; landslides; hot, driving windstorms called khamsin occur in spring; dust storms; sandstorms

Environment - current issues

uncontrolled deforestation especially in watershed areas; soil erosion; air and water pollution in major urban centers; coral reef degradation; increasing pollution of coastal mangrove swamps that are important fish breeding grounds

agricultural land being lost to urbanization and windblown sands; increasing soil salination below Aswan High Dam; desertification; oil pollution threatening coral reefs, beaches, and marine habitats; other water pollution from agricultural pesticides, raw sewage, and industrial effluents; limited natural freshwater resources away from the Nile, which is the only perennial water source; rapid growth in population overstraining the Nile and natural resources

Environment - international agreements

party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Tropical Timber 83, Tropical Timber 94, Wetlands, Whaling

signed, but not ratified: Air Pollution-Persistent Organic Pollutants

party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Environmental Modification, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Tropical Timber 83, Tropical Timber 94, Wetlands

signed, but not ratified: none of the selected agreements

Geography - note

note 1: favorably located in relation to many of Southeast Asia's main water bodies: the South China Sea, Philippine Sea, Sulu Sea, Celebes Sea, and Luzon Strait

note 2: for decades, the Philippine archipelago was reported as having 7,107 islands; in 2016, the national mapping authority reported that hundreds of new islands had been discovered and increased the number of islands to 7,641 - though not all of the new islands have been verified

controls Sinai Peninsula, only land bridge between Africa and remainder of Eastern Hemisphere; controls Suez Canal, a sea link between Indian Ocean and Mediterranean Sea; size, and juxtaposition to Israel, establish its major role in Middle Eastern geopolitics; dependence on upstream neighbors; dominance of Nile basin issues; prone to influxes of refugees from Sudan and the Palestinian territories

People comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Population

104,256,076 (July 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 13

97,041,072 (July 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 14

Nationality

noun: Filipino(s)

adjective: Philippine

noun: Egyptian(s)

adjective: Egyptian

Ethnic groups

Tagalog 28.1%, Cebuano 13.1%, Ilocano 9%, Bisaya/Binisaya 7.6%, Hiligaynon Ilonggo 7.5%, Bikol 6%, Waray 3.4%, other 25.3% (2000 census)

Egyptian 99.6%, other 0.4% (2006 census)

Languages

Filipino (official; based on Tagalog) and English (official); eight major dialects - Tagalog, Cebuano, Ilocano, Hiligaynon or Ilonggo, Bicol, Waray, Pampango, and Pangasinan

Arabic (official), English and French widely understood by educated classes

Religions

Catholic 82.9% (Roman Catholic 80.9%, Aglipayan 2%), Muslim 5%, Evangelical 2.8%, Iglesia ni Kristo 2.3%, other Christian 4.5%, other 1.8%, unspecified 0.6%, none 0.1% (2000 census)

-
Dependency ratios

total dependency ratio: 58.2

youth dependency ratio: 51

elderly dependency ratio: 7.2

potential support ratio: 13.8 (2015 est.)

total dependency ratio: 61.8

youth dependency ratio: 53.6

elderly dependency ratio: 8.2

potential support ratio: 12.2 (2015 est.)

Median age

total: 23.5 years

male: 23.1 years

female: 24 years (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 169

total: 23.9 years

male: 23.6 years

female: 24.2 years (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 166

Population growth rate

1.57% (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 70

2.45% (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 22

Birth rate

23.7 births/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 61

29.6 births/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 40

Death rate

6.1 deaths/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 156

4.6 deaths/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 203

Net migration rate

-2 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 162

-0.5 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 123

Population distribution

population concentrated where good farmlands lie; highest concentrations are northwest and south-central Luzon, the southeastern extension of Luzon, and the islands of the Visayan Sea, particularly Cebu and Negros; Manila is home to one-eighth of the entire national population

approximately 95% of the population lives within 20 km of the Nile River and its delta; vast areas of the country remain sparsely populated or uninhabited

Urbanization

urban population: 44.2% of total population (2017)

rate of urbanization: 1.57% annual rate of change (2015-20 est.)

urban population: 43.3% of total population (2017)

rate of urbanization: 1.8% annual rate of change (2015-20 est.)

Major urban areas - population

MANILA (capital) 12.946 million; Davao 1.63 million; Cebu City 951,000; Zamboanga 936,000 (2015)

CAIRO (capital) 18.772 million; Alexandria 4.778 million (2015)

Sex ratio

at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female

0-14 years: 1.04 male(s)/female

15-24 years: 1.04 male(s)/female

25-54 years: 1.03 male(s)/female

55-64 years: 0.84 male(s)/female

65 years and over: 0.72 male(s)/female

total population: 1.01 male(s)/female (2017 est.)

at birth: 1.06 male(s)/female

0-14 years: 1.07 male(s)/female

15-24 years: 1.06 male(s)/female

25-54 years: 1.03 male(s)/female

55-64 years: 0.98 male(s)/female

65 years and over: 0.82 male(s)/female

total population: 1.05 male(s)/female (2017 est.)

Mother's mean age at first birth

23 years

note: median age at first birth among women 25-29 (2013 est.)

22.7 years

note: median age at first birth among women 25-29 (2014 est.)

Maternal mortality ratio

114 deaths/100,000 live births (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 71

33 deaths/100,000 live births (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 110

Infant mortality rate

total: 21.4 deaths/1,000 live births

male: 24.3 deaths/1,000 live births

female: 18.3 deaths/1,000 live births (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 77

total: 19 deaths/1,000 live births

male: 20.2 deaths/1,000 live births

female: 17.7 deaths/1,000 live births (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 84

Life expectancy at birth

total population: 69.4 years

male: 65.9 years

female: 73.1 years (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 162

total population: 73 years

male: 71.6 years

female: 74.4 years (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 142

Total fertility rate

3.02 children born/woman (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 55

3.47 children born/woman (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 44

Contraceptive prevalence rate

55.1% (2013)

58.5% (2014)

Health expenditures

4.7% of GDP (2014)

country comparison to the world: 152

5.6% of GDP (2014)

country comparison to the world: 119

Hospital bed density

1 beds/1,000 population (2011)

1.6 beds/1,000 population (2014)

Drinking water source

improved:

urban: 93.7% of population

rural: 90.3% of population

total: 91.8% of population

unimproved:

urban: 6.3% of population

rural: 9.7% of population

total: 8.2% of population (2015 est.)

improved:

urban: 100% of population

rural: 99% of population

total: 99.4% of population

unimproved:

urban: 0% of population

rural: 1% of population

total: 0.6% of population (2015 est.)

Sanitation facility access

improved:

urban: 77.9% of population

rural: 70.8% of population

total: 73.9% of population

unimproved:

urban: 22.1% of population

rural: 29.2% of population

total: 26.1% of population (2015 est.)

improved:

urban: 96.8% of population

rural: 93.1% of population

total: 94.7% of population

unimproved:

urban: 3.2% of population

rural: 6.9% of population

total: 5.3% of population (2015 est.)

HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate

0.1% (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 108

<.1% (2016 est.)

HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS

56,000 (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 54

11,000 (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 90

HIV/AIDS - deaths

<1000 (2016 est.)

<500 (2016 est.)

Major infectious diseases

degree of risk: high

food or waterborne diseases: bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever

vectorborne diseases: dengue fever and malaria

water contact disease: leptospirosis (2016)

degree of risk: intermediate

food or waterborne diseases: bacterial diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever

water contact disease: schistosomiasis (2016)

Obesity - adult prevalence rate

6.4% (2016)

country comparison to the world: 168

32% (2016)

country comparison to the world: 18

Children under the age of 5 years underweight

19.9% (2013)

country comparison to the world: 29

7% (2014)

country comparison to the world: 77

Education expenditures

2.7% of GDP (2009)

country comparison to the world: 149

3.8% of GDP (2008)

country comparison to the world: 117

Literacy

definition: age 15 and over can read and write

total population: 96.3%

male: 95.8%

female: 96.8% (2015 est.)

definition: age 15 and over can read and write

total population: 73.8%

male: 82.2%

female: 65.4% (2015 est.)

School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education)

total: 13 years

male: 12 years

female: 13 years (2013)

total: 13 years

male: 13 years

female: 13 years (2014)

Unemployment, youth ages 15-24

total: 15%

male: 14.3%

female: 16% (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 89

total: 31.3%

male: 28.4%

female: 37.6% (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 32

Demographic profile -

Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world and the third most populous country in Africa, behind Nigeria and Ethiopia. Most of the country is desert, so about 95% of the population is concentrated in a narrow strip of fertile land along the Nile River, which represents only about 5% of Egypt’s land area. Egypt’s rapid population growth – 46% between 1994 and 2014 – stresses limited natural resources, jobs, housing, sanitation, education, and health care.

Although the country’s total fertility rate (TFR) fell from roughly 5.5 children per woman in 1980 to just over 3 in the late 1990s, largely as a result of state-sponsored family planning programs, the population growth rate dropped more modestly because of decreased mortality rates and longer life expectancies. During the last decade, Egypt’s TFR decline stalled for several years and then reversed, reaching 3.6 in 2011, and has plateaued the last few years. Contraceptive use has held steady at about 60%, while preferences for larger families and early marriage may have strengthened in the wake of the recent 2011 revolution. The large cohort of women of or nearing childbearing age will sustain high population growth for the foreseeable future (an effect called population momentum).

Nevertheless, post-MUBARAK governments have not made curbing population growth a priority. To increase contraceptive use and to prevent further overpopulation will require greater government commitment and substantial social change, including encouraging smaller families and better educating and empowering women. Currently, literacy, educational attainment, and labor force participation rates are much lower for women than men. In addition, the prevalence of violence against women, the lack of female political representation, and the perpetuation of the nearly universal practice of female genital cutting continue to keep women from playing a more significant role in Egypt’s public sphere.

Population pressure, poverty, high unemployment, and the fragmentation of inherited land holdings have historically motivated Egyptians, primarily young men, to migrate internally from rural and smaller urban areas in the Nile Delta region and the poorer rural south to Cairo, Alexandria, and other urban centers in the north, while a much smaller number migrated to the Red Sea and Sinai areas. Waves of forced internal migration also resulted from the 1967 Arab-Israeli War and the floods caused by the completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1970. Limited numbers of students and professionals emigrated temporarily prior to the early 1970s, when economic problems and high unemployment pushed the Egyptian Government to lift restrictions on labor migration. At the same time, high oil revenues enabled Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and other Gulf states, as well as Libya and Jordan, to fund development projects, creating a demand for unskilled labor (mainly in construction), which attracted tens of thousands of young Egyptian men.

Between 1970 and 1974 alone, Egyptian migrants in the Gulf countries increased from approximately 70,000 to 370,000. Egyptian officials encouraged legal labor migration both to alleviate unemployment and to generate remittance income (remittances continue to be one of Egypt’s largest sources of foreign currency and GDP). During the mid-1980s, however, depressed oil prices resulting from the Iran-Iraq War, decreased demand for low-skilled labor, competition from less costly South Asian workers, and efforts to replace foreign workers with locals significantly reduced Egyptian migration to the Gulf States. The number of Egyptian migrants dropped from a peak of almost 3.3 million in 1983 to about 2.2 million at the start of the 1990s, but numbers gradually recovered.

In the 2000s, Egypt began facilitating more labor migration through bilateral agreements, notably with Arab countries and Italy, but illegal migration to Europe through overstayed visas or maritime human smuggling via Libya also rose. The Egyptian Government estimated there were 6.5 million Egyptian migrants in 2009, with roughly 75% being temporary migrants in other Arab countries (Libya, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates) and 25% being predominantly permanent migrants in the West (US, UK, Italy, France, and Canada).

During the 2000s, Egypt became an increasingly important transit and destination country for economic migrants and asylum seekers, including Palestinians, East Africans, and South Asians and, more recently, Iraqis and Syrians. Egypt draws many refugees because of its resettlement programs with the West; Cairo has one of the largest urban refugee populations in the world. Many East African migrants are interned or live in temporary encampments along the Egypt-Israel border, and some have been shot and killed by Egyptian border guards.

Physicians density -

0.81 physicians/1,000 population (2014)

Government comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Country name

conventional long form: Republic of the Philippines

conventional short form: Philippines

local long form: Republika ng Pilipinas

local short form: Pilipinas

etymology: named in honor of King PHILLIP II of Spain by Spanish explorer Ruy LOPEZ de VILLALOBOS, who visited some of the islands in 1543

conventional long form: Arab Republic of Egypt

conventional short form: Egypt

local long form: Jumhuriyat Misr al-Arabiyah

local short form: Misr

former: United Arab Republic (with Syria)

etymology: the English name "Egypt" derives from the ancient Greek name for the country "Aigyptos"; the Arabic name "Misr" can be traced to the ancient Akkadian "misru" meaning border or frontier

Government type

presidential republic

presidential republic

Capital

name: Manila

geographic coordinates: 14 36 N, 120 58 E

time difference: UTC+8 (13 hours ahead of Washington, DC, during Standard Time)

name: Cairo

geographic coordinates: 30 03 N, 31 15 E

time difference: UTC+2 (7 hours ahead of Washington, DC, during Standard Time)

Administrative divisions

80 provinces and 39 chartered cities

provinces: Abra, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Aklan, Albay, Antique, Apayao, Aurora, Basilan, Bataan, Batanes, Batangas, Biliran, Benguet, Bohol, Bukidnon, Bulacan, Cagayan, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Camiguin, Capiz, Catanduanes, Cavite, Cebu, Compostela, Cotabato, Davao del Norte, Davao del Sur, Davao Oriental, Dinagat Islands, Eastern Samar, Guimaras, Ifugao, Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, Iloilo, Isabela, Kalinga, Laguna, Lanao del Norte, Lanao del Sur, La Union, Leyte, Maguindanao, Marinduque, Masbate, Mindoro Occidental, Mindoro Oriental, Misamis Occidental, Misamis Oriental, Mountain, Negros Occidental, Negros Oriental, Northern Samar, Nueva Ecija, Nueva Vizcaya, Palawan, Pampanga, Pangasinan, Quezon, Quirino, Rizal, Romblon, Samar, Sarangani, Siquijor, Sorsogon, South Cotabato, Southern Leyte, Sultan Kudarat, Sulu, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur, Tarlac, Tawi-Tawi, Zambales, Zamboanga del Norte, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay

chartered cities: Angeles, Antipolo, Bacolod, Baguio, Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Caloocan, Cebu, Cotabato, Dagupan, Davao, General Santos, Iligan, Iloilo, Lapu-Lapu, Las Pinas, Lucena, Makati, Malabon, Mandaluyong, Mandaue, Manila, Marikina, Muntinlupa, Naga, Navotas, Olongapo, Ormoc, Paranaque, Pasay, Pasig, Puerto Princesa, Quezon, San Juan, Santiago, Tacloban, Taguig, Valenzuela, Zamboanga (2012)

27 governorates (muhafazat, singular - muhafazat); Ad Daqahliyah, Al Bahr al Ahmar (Red Sea), Al Buhayrah, Al Fayyum, Al Gharbiyah, Al Iskandariyah (Alexandria), Al Isma'iliyah (Ismailia), Al Jizah (Giza), Al Minufiyah, Al Minya, Al Qahirah (Cairo), Al Qalyubiyah, Al Uqsur (Luxor), Al Wadi al Jadid (New Valley), As Suways (Suez), Ash Sharqiyah, Aswan, Asyut, Bani Suwayf, Bur Sa'id (Port Said), Dumyat (Damietta), Janub Sina' (South Sinai), Kafr ash Shaykh, Matruh, Qina, Shamal Sina' (North Sinai), Suhaj

Independence

4 July 1946 (from the US)

28 February 1922 (from UK protectorate status; the revolution that began on 23 July 1952 led to a republic being declared on 18 June 1953 and all British troops withdrawn on 18 June 1956); note - it was ca. 3200 B.C. that the Two Lands of Upper (southern) and Lower (northern) Egypt were first united politically

National holiday

Independence Day, 12 June (1898); note - 12 June 1898 was date of declaration of independence from Spain; 4 July 1946 was date of independence from the US

Revolution Day, 23 July (1952)

Constitution

history: several previous; latest ratified 2 February 1987, effective 11 February 1987

amendments: proposed by Congress if supported by three-fourths of the membership, by a constitution convention called by Congress, or by public petition; passage by either of the 3 proposal methods requires a majority vote in a national referendum; note - the constitution has not been amended since its enactment in 1987 (2017)

history: several previous; latest approved by a constitutional committee in December 2013, approved by referendum held on 14-15 January 2014, ratified by interim president on 19 January 2014

amendments: proposed by the president of the republic or by one-fifth of the House of Representatives members; a decision to accept the proposal requires majority vote by House members; passage of amendment requires a two-thirds majority vote by House members and passage by majority vote in a referendum; articles of reelection of the president and principles of freedom not amendable unless the amendment "brings more guarantees" (2017)

Legal system

mixed legal system of civil, common, Islamic, and customary law

mixed legal system based on Napoleonic civil and penal law, Islamic religious law, and vestiges of colonial-era laws; judicial review of the constitutionality of laws by the Supreme Constitutional Court

International law organization participation

accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations; accepts ICCt jurisdiction

accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction with reservations; non-party state to the ICCt

Citizenship

citizenship by birth: no

citizenship by descent only: at least one parent must be a citizen of the Philippines

dual citizenship recognized: no

residency requirement for naturalization: 10 years

citizenship by birth: no

citizenship by descent only: if the father was born in Egypt

dual citizenship recognized: only with prior permission from the government

residency requirement for naturalization: 10 years

Suffrage

18 years of age; universal

18 years of age; universal and compulsory

Executive branch

chief of state: President Rodrigo DUTERTE (since 30 June 2016); Vice President Leni ROBREDO (since 30 June 2016); note - the president is both chief of state and head of government

head of government: President Rodrigo DUTERTE (since 30 June 2016); Vice President Leni ROBREDO (since 30 June 2016)

cabinet: Cabinet appointed by the president with the consent of the Commission of Appointments, an independent body of 25 Congressional members including the Senate president (ex officio chairman), appointed by the president

elections/appointments: president and vice president directly elected on separate ballots by simple majority popular vote for a single 6-year term; election last held on 9 May 2016 (next to be held in May 2022)

election results: Rodrigo DUTERTE elected president; percent of vote - Rodrigo DUTERTE (PDP-Laban) 39%, Manuel "Mar" ROXAS (LP) 23.5%, Grace POE (independent) 21.4%, Jejomar BINAY (UNA) 12.7%, Miriam Defensor SANTIAGO (PRP) 3.4%; Leni ROBREDO elected vice president; percent of vote Leni ROBREDO (LP) 35.1%, Bongbong MARCOS (independent) 34.5%, Alan CAYETANO 14.4%, Francis ESCUDERO (independent) 12%, Antonio TRILLANES (independent) 2.1%, Gregorio HONASAN (UNA) 1.9%

Chief of state: President Abdelfattah Said ELSISI (since 8 June 2014)

head of government: Prime Minister Sherif ISMAIL (since 12 September 2015); note - Prime Minister Ibrahim MEHLAB resigned 12 September 2015

cabinet: Cabinet ministers nominated by the executive authorities and approved by the House of Representtives

elections/appointments: president elected by absolute majority popular vote in 2 rounds if needed for a 4-year term (eligible for a second term); election last held on 26-28 March 2018 (next to be held in 2022); prime minister appointed by the president, approved by the House of Representatives

election results: Abdelfattah Said ELSISI elected president in first round; percent of valid votes case - Abdelfattah Said ELSISI (independent) 97.8%, Moussa Mostafa MOUSSA (El Ghad Party) 2.3%; note - over 7% of ballots cast were deemed invalid

Legislative branch

description: bicameral Congress or Kongreso consists of the Senate or Senado (24 seats; members directly elected in multi-seat constituencies by majority vote; members serve 6-year terms with one-half of the membership renewed every 3 years) and the House of Representatives or Kapulungan Ng Mga Kinatawan (297 seats; 238 members directly elected in single-seat constituencies by simple majority vote and 59 representing minorities directly elected by party-list proportional representation vote; members serve 3-year terms)

elections: Senate - elections last held on 9 May 2016 (next to be held in May 2019); House of Representatives - elections last held on 9 May 2016 (next to be held in May 2019)

election results: Senate - percent of vote by party - LP 31.3%, NPC 10.1%, UNA 7.6%, Akbayan 5.0%, other 30.9%, independent 15.1%; seats by party - LP 6, NPC 3, UNA 4, Akbayan 1, other 10; House of Representatives - percent of vote by party - LP 41.7%, NPC 17.0%, UNA 6.6%, NUP 9.7%, NP 9.4%, independent 6.0%, others 10.1%; seats by party - LP 115, NPC 42, NUP 23, NP 24, UNA 11, other 19, independent 4, party-list 59

description: unicameral House of Representatives (Majlis Al-Nowaab); 596 seats; 448 members directly elected by individual candidacy system, 120 members - with quotas for women, youth, Christians and workers - elected in party-list constituencies by simple majority popular vote, and 28 members selected by the president; member term 5 years; note - inaugural session held on 10 January 2016

elections: multi-phase election completed on 16 December 2015 (next to be held in 2020

election results: percent of vote by party - NA; seats by party -– Free Egyptians Party 65, Future of the Nation 53, New Wafd Party 36, Homeland’s Protector Party 18, Republican People’s Party 13, Congress Party 12, al-Nour Party 11, Conservative Party 6, Democratic Peace Party 5, Egyptian Social Democratic Party 4, Egyptian National Movement 4, Modern Egypt Party 4, Reform and Development Party 3, Freedom Party 3, My Homeland Egypt Party 3, National Progressive Unionist Party 2, Arab Democratic Nasserist Party 1, Revolutionary Guards Party 1,El Serh El Masry el Hor Party 1, independent 351

Judicial branch

highest court(s): Supreme Court (consists of a chief justice and 14 associate justices)

judge selection and term of office: justices are appointed by the president on the recommendation of the Judicial and Bar Council, a constitutionally created, 6-member body that recommends Supreme Court nominees; justices serve until age 70

subordinate courts: Court of Appeals; Sandiganbayan (special court for corruption cases of government officials); Court of Tax Appeals; regional, metropolitan, and municipal trial courts; sharia courts

highest court(s): Supreme Constitutional Court or SCC (consists of the court president and 10 justices); the SCC serves as the final court of arbitration on the constitutionality of laws and conflicts between lower courts regarding jurisdiction and rulings; Court of Cassation (CC) (consists of the court president and 550 judges organized in circuits with cases heard by panels of 5 judges); the CC is the highest appeals body for civil and criminal cases, also known as “ordinary justices"; Supreme Administrative Court (SAC) - consists of the court president and organized in circuits with cases heard by panels of 5 judges); the SAC is the highest court of the State Council

judge selection and term of office: under the 2014 constitution, all judges and justices selected by the Supreme Judiciary Council and appointed by the president of the Republic; judges appointed for life

subordinate courts: Courts of Appeal; Courts of First Instance; courts of limited jurisdiction; Family Court (established in 2004)

Political parties and leaders

Akbayon [Machris CABREROS]

Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino (Struggle of Filipino Democrats) or LDP [Edgardo ANGARA]

Lakas ng EDSA-Christian Muslim Democrats or Lakas-CMD [Ferdinand Martin ROMUALDEZ]

Liberal Party or LP [Francis PANGILINAN]

Nacionalista Party or NP [Manuel "Manny" VILLAR]

Nationalist People's Coalition or NPC [Eduardo COJUNGCO, Jr.]

National Unity Party or NUP [Albert GARCIA]

PDP-Laban [Aquilino PIMENTEL III]

People's Reform Party or PRP [Narcisco SANTIAGO]

Puwersa ng Masang Pilipino (Force of the Philippine Masses) or PMP [Joseph ESTRADA]

United Nationalist Alliance or UNA

Al-Nour [Yunis MAKHYUN]

Arab Democratic Nasserist Party [Sayed Abdel GHANY]

Congress Party [Omar Mokhtar SEMEIDA]

Conservative Party [Akmal KOURTAM]

Democratic Peace Party [Ahmed FADALY]

Egyptian National Movement Party [Gen. Raouf EL SAYED]

Egyptian Social Democratic Party [Farid ZAHRAN]

El Ghad Party [Moussa Mostafa MOUSSA]

El Serh El Masry el Hor [Tarek Ahmed Abbas Nadim]

Freedom Party [Salah HASSABALAH]

Free Egyptians Party [Essam KHALIL]

Homeland’s Protector Party [Lt. Gen. (retired) Galal AL-HARIDI]

Modern Egypt Party [Nabil DEIBIS]

Mostaqbal Watan (Future of the Nation) Party [Mohamed Ashraf RASHAD]

My Homeland Egypt Party [Qadry ABU HUSSEIN]

National Progressive Unionist (Tagammu) Party [Sayed Abdel AAL]

New Wafd Party [Bahaa ABU SHOUSA]

Reform and Development Party [Mohamad Anwar al-SADAT]

Republican People’s Party [Hazim OMAR]

Revolutionary Guards Party [Magdy EL-SHARIF]

Political pressure groups and leaders

Black and White Movement or BWM [Vicente ROMANO]

People Action (Kilosbayan)

labor, student, teacher unions

trade syndicates

International organization participation

ADB, APEC, ARF, ASEAN, BIS, CD, CICA (observer), CP, EAS, FAO, G-24, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC (national committees), ICCt, ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, ITUC (NGOs), MIGA, MINUSTAH, NAM, OAS (observer), OPCW, PCA, PIF (partner), UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, Union Latina, UNMIL, UNMOGIP, UNOCI, UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO

ABEDA, AfDB, AFESD, AMF, AU, BSEC (observer), CAEU, CD, CICA, COMESA, D-8, EBRD, FAO, G-15, G-24, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC (national committees), ICRM, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, LAS, MIGA, MINURSO, MINUSMA, MONUSCO, NAM, OAPEC, OAS (observer), OIC, OIF, OSCE (partner), PCA, UN, UN Security Council (temporary), UNAMID, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNMISS, UNOCI, UNRWA, UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO

Diplomatic representation in the US

chief of mission: Ambassador Jose Manuel del Gallego ROMUALDEZ (since 29 November 2017)

chancery: 1600 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036

telephone: [1] (202) 467-9300

FAX: [1] (202) 328-7614

consulate(s) general: Chicago, Honolulu, Los Angeles, New York, Saipan (Northern Mariana Islands), San Francisco, Tamuning (Guam)

chief of mission: Ambassador Yasser REDA (since 19 September 2015)

chancery: 3521 International Court NW, Washington, DC 20008

telephone: [1] (202) 895-5400

FAX: [1] (202) 244-5131

consulate(s) general: Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York

Diplomatic representation from the US

chief of mission: Ambassador Sung KIM (since 6 December 2016)

embassy: 1201 Roxas Boulevard, Manila 1000

mailing address: PSC 500, FPO AP 96515-1000

telephone: [63] (2) 301-2000

FAX: [63] (2) 301-2017

chief of mission: Ambassador (vacant); Charge d'Affaires Thomas H. GOLDBERGER (since 30 June 2017)

embassy: 5 Tawfik Diab St., Garden City, Cairo

mailing address: Unit 64900, Box 15, APO AE 09839-4900; 5 Tawfik Diab Street, Garden City, Cairo

telephone: [20-2] 2797-3300

FAX: [20-2] 2797-3200

Flag description

two equal horizontal bands of blue (top) and red; a white equilateral triangle is based on the hoist side; the center of the triangle displays a yellow sun with eight primary rays; each corner of the triangle contains a small, yellow, five-pointed star; blue stands for peace and justice, red symbolizes courage, the white equal-sided triangle represents equality; the rays recall the first eight provinces that sought independence from Spain, while the stars represent the three major geographical divisions of the country: Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao; the design of the flag dates to 1897

note: in wartime the flag is flown upside down with the red band at the top

three equal horizontal bands of red (top), white, and black; the national emblem (a gold Eagle of Saladin facing the hoist side with a shield superimposed on its chest above a scroll bearing the name of the country in Arabic) centered in the white band; the band colors derive from the Arab Liberation flag and represent oppression (black), overcome through bloody struggle (red), to be replaced by a bright future (white)

note: similar to the flag of Syria, which has two green stars in the white band, Iraq, which has an Arabic inscription centered in the white band, and Yemen, which has a plain white band

National symbol(s)

three stars and sun, Philippine eagle; national colors: red, white, blue, yellow

golden eagle, white lotus; national colors: red, white, black

National anthem

name: "Lupang Hinirang" (Chosen Land)

lyrics/music: Jose PALMA (revised by Felipe PADILLA de Leon)/Julian FELIPE

note: music adopted 1898, original Spanish lyrics adopted 1899, Filipino (Tagalog) lyrics adopted 1956; although the original lyrics were written in Spanish, later English and Filipino versions were created; today, only the Filipino version is used

name: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" (My Homeland, My Homeland, My Homeland)

lyrics/music: Younis-al QADI/Sayed DARWISH

note: adopted 1979; the current anthem, less militaristic than the previous one, was created after the signing of the 1979 peace treaty with Israel; Sayed DARWISH, commonly considered the father of modern Egyptian music, composed the anthem

Economy comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Economy - overview

The economy has been relatively resilient to global economic shocks due to less exposure to troubled international securities, lower dependence on exports, relatively resilient domestic consumption, large remittances from about 10 million overseas Filipino workers and migrants, and a rapidly expanding services industry. During 2017, the current account balance fell into the negative range, the first time since the 2008 global financial crisis, in part due to an ambitious new infrastructure spending program announced this year. However, international reserves remain at comfortable levels and the banking system is stable.

Efforts to improve tax administration and expenditures management have helped ease the Philippines' debt burden and tight fiscal situation. The Philippines received investment-grade credit ratings on its sovereign debt under the former AQUINO administration and has had little difficulty financing its budget deficits. However, weak absorptive capacity and implementation bottlenecks have prevented the government from maximizing its expenditure plans. Although it has improved, the low tax-to-GDP ratio remains a constraint to supporting increasingly higher spending levels and sustaining high and inclusive growth over the longer term.

Economic growth has accelerated, averaging over 6% per year from 2011 to 2017, compared with 4.5% under the MACAPAGAL-ARROYO government; and competitiveness rankings have improved. Although 2017 saw a new record year for net foreign direct investment inflows, FDI to the Philippines has continued to lag regional peers, in part because the Philippine constitution and other laws limit foreign investment and restrict foreign ownership in important activities/sectors - such as land ownership and public utilities.

Although the economy grew at a rapid pace under the AQUINO government, challenges to achieving more inclusive growth remain. Wealth is concentrated in the hands of the rich. The unemployment rate declined from 7.3% to 5.7% between 2010 and 2017; while there has been some improvement, underemployment remains high at around 17% to 18% of the employed population. At least 40% of the employed work in the informal sector. Poverty afflicts more than a fifth of the total population but is as high as 75% in some areas of the southern Philippines. More than 60% of the poor reside in rural areas, where the incidence of poverty (about 30%) is more severe - a challenge to raising rural farm and non-farm incomes. Continued efforts are needed to improve governance, the judicial system, the regulatory environment, the infrastructure, and the overall ease of doing business.

2016 saw the election of President Rodrigo DUTERTE, who has pledged to make inclusive growth and poverty reduction his top priority. DUTERTE believes that illegal drug use, crime and corruption are key barriers to economic development. The administration wants to reduce the poverty rate to 17% and graduate the economy to upper-middle income status by the end of President DUTERTE’s term in 2022. Key themes under the government’s Ten-Point Socioeconomic Agenda include continuity of macroeconomic policy, tax reform, higher investments in infrastructure and human capital development, and improving competitiveness and the overall ease of doing business. The administration sees infrastructure shortcomings as a key barrier to sustained economic growth and has pledged to spend $165 billion on infrastructure by 2022. Although the final outcome has yet to be seen, the current administration is shepherding legislation for a comprehensive tax reform program to raise revenues for its ambitious infrastructure spending plan and to promote a more equitable and efficient tax system. However, the need to finance rehabilitation and reconstruction efforts in the southern region of Mindanao following the 2017 Marawi City siege may compete with other spending on infrastructure.

Occupying the northeast corner of the African continent, Egypt is bisected by the highly fertile Nile valley where most economic activity takes place. Egypt's economy was highly centralized during the rule of former President Gamal Abdel NASSER but opened up considerably under former Presidents Anwar EL-SADAT and Mohamed Hosni MUBARAK. Agriculture, hydrocarbons, manufacturing, tourism, and other service sectors drove the country’s relatively diverse economic activity.

Despite Egypt’s mixed record for attracting foreign investment over the past two decades, poor living conditions and limited job opportunities have contributed to public discontent. These socioeconomic pressures were a major factor leading to the January 2011 revolution that ousted MUBARAK. The uncertain political, security, and policy environment since 2011 has restricted economic growth and failed to alleviate persistent unemployment, especially among the young.

In late 2016, persistent dollar shortages and waning aid from its Gulf allies led Cairo to turn to the IMF for a 3-year, $12 billion loan program. To secure the deal, Cairo floated its currency, introduced new taxes, and cut energy subsidies - all of which pushed inflation above 30% for most of 2017, a high that had not been seen in a generation. Since the currency float, foreign investment in Egypt’s high interest treasury bills has risen exponentially, boosting both dollar availability and central bank reserves. Cairo will need to make a sustained effort to implement a range of business reforms, however, to induce foreign and local investment in manufacturing and other labor-intensive sectors.

GDP (purchasing power parity)

$874.5 billion (2017 est.)

$820.4 billion (2016 est.)

$767.2 billion (2015 est.)

note: data are in 2017 dollars

country comparison to the world: 30

$1.199 trillion (2017 est.)

$1.152 trillion (2016 est.)

$1.104 trillion (2015 est.)

note: data are in 2017 dollars

country comparison to the world: 22

GDP (official exchange rate)

$321.2 billion (2017 est.)

$332.3 billion (2017 est.)

GDP - real growth rate

6.6% (2017 est.)

6.9% (2016 est.)

6.1% (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 16

4.1% (2017 est.)

4.3% (2016 est.)

4.4% (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 62

GDP - per capita (PPP)

$8,200 (2017 est.)

$7,900 (2016 est.)

$7,500 (2015 est.)

note: data are in 2017 dollars

country comparison to the world: 152

$13,000 (2017 est.)

$12,800 (2016 est.)

$12,400 (2015 est.)

note: data are in 2017 dollars

country comparison to the world: 118

Gross national saving

25.8% of GDP (2017 est.)

24.5% of GDP (2016 est.)

23.7% of GDP (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 47

9.7% of GDP (2017 est.)

9.1% of GDP (2016 est.)

10.7% of GDP (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 161

GDP - composition, by end use

household consumption: 72.7%

government consumption: 10.9%

investment in fixed capital: 25.2%

investment in inventories: -0.2%

exports of goods and services: 32.1%

imports of goods and services: -40.7% (2017 est.)

household consumption: 79.2%

government consumption: 12.2%

investment in fixed capital: 17.3%

investment in inventories: 1.3%

exports of goods and services: 13.5%

imports of goods and services: -23.5% (2017 est.)

GDP - composition, by sector of origin

agriculture: 9.4%

industry: 30.8%

services: 59.8% (2017 est.)

agriculture: 11.9%

industry: 33.1%

services: 55.7% (2017 est.)

Agriculture - products

rice, fish, livestock, poultry, bananas, coconut/copra, corn, sugarcane, mangoes, pineapple, cassava

cotton, rice, corn, wheat, beans, fruits, vegetables; cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goats

Industries

semiconductors and electronics assembly, business process outsourcing, food and beverage manufacturing, construction, electric/gas/water supply, chemical products, radio/television/communications equipment and apparatus, petroleum and fuel, textile and garments, non-metallic minerals, basic metal industries, transport equipment

textiles, food processing, tourism, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, hydrocarbons, construction, cement, metals, light manufactures

Industrial production growth rate

6.5% (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 29

3.5% (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 86

Labor force

44.46 million (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 16

29.95 million (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 23

Labor force - by occupation

agriculture: 26.9%

industry: 17.5%

services: 55.6% (2016 est.)

agriculture: 29.2%

industry: 23.5%

services: 47.3% (2015 est.)

Unemployment rate

6% (2017 est.)

5.5% (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 86

12.2% (2017 est.)

12.7% (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 160

Population below poverty line

21.6% (2017 est.)

25.2% (2016 est.)

Household income or consumption by percentage share

lowest 10%: 3.2%

highest 10%: 29.5% (2015 est.)

lowest 10%: 4%

highest 10%: 26.6% (2008 est.)

Distribution of family income - Gini index

44.4 (2015 est.)

46 (2012 est.)

country comparison to the world: 46

30.8 (2015 est.)

32.1 (2012 est.)

country comparison to the world: 128

Budget

revenues: $44.74 billion

expenditures: $53.55 billion (2017 est.)

revenues: $35.54 billion

expenditures: $55.09 billion (2017 est.)

Taxes and other revenues

13.9% of GDP (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 198

14.7% of GDP (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 193

Budget surplus (+) or deficit (-)

-2.7% of GDP (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 103

-9.8% of GDP (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 206

Public debt

41.9% of GDP (2017 est.)

42.1% of GDP (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 131

104.4% of GDP (2017 est.)

111.2% of GDP (2016 est.)

note: data cover central government debt and includes debt instruments issued (or owned) by government entities other than the treasury; the data include treasury debt held by foreign entities; the data include debt issued by subnational entities, as well as intra-governmental debt; intra-governmental debt consists of treasury borrowings from surpluses in the social funds, such as for retirement, medical care, and unemployment; debt instruments for the social funds are sold at public auctions

country comparison to the world: 15

Fiscal year

calendar year

1 July - 30 June

Inflation rate (consumer prices)

3.1% (2017 est.)

1.8% (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 130

23.5% (2017 est.)

10.2% (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 219

Central bank discount rate

3.56% (31 December 2016 est.)

6.19% (31 December 2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 101

9.75% (9 July 2017 est.)

8.75% (3 November 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 25

Commercial bank prime lending rate

6% (31 December 2017 est.)

5.64% (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 127

19.5% (31 December 2017 est.)

13.6% (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 19

Stock of narrow money

$68.16 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$61.62 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 48

$43.56 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$34.51 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 57

Stock of broad money

$199 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$183.5 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 41

$196.6 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$146.6 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 42

Stock of domestic credit

$207.4 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$184.6 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 46

$194.1 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$178.7 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 48

Market value of publicly traded shares

$290.4 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

$286.1 billion (31 December 2015 est.)

$318 billion (31 December 2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 29

$55.19 billion (30 December 2016 est.)

$70.08 billion (31 December 2015 est.)

$61.63 billion (31 December 2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 49

Current account balance

$-315 million (2017 est.)

$601 million (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 97

$-19.83 billion (2017 est.)

$-19.83 billion (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 191

Exports

$53.22 billion (2017 est.)

$43.44 billion (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 51

$23.53 billion (2017 est.)

$20.02 billion (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 68

Exports - commodities

semiconductors and electronic products, machinery and transport equipment, wood manufactures, chemicals, processed food and beverages, garments, coconut oil, copper concentrates, seafood, bananas/fruits

crude oil and petroleum products, fruits and vegetables, cotton, textiles, metal products, chemicals, processed food

Exports - partners

Japan 16.2%, US 14.8%, Hong Kong 13.7%, China 11.1%, Singapore 6.1%, Thailand 4.2%, Germany 4.1%, South Korea 4% (2017)

UAE 12.5%, Saudi Arabia 7.7%, Italy 6.5%, Turkey 6.3%, UK 4.6%, US 4.5% (2016)

Imports

$90.42 billion (2017 est.)

$77.52 billion (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 37

$53.02 billion (2017 est.)

$56.71 billion (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 48

Imports - commodities

electronic products, mineral fuels, machinery and transport equipment, iron and steel, textile fabrics, grains, chemicals, plastic

machinery and equipment, foodstuffs, chemicals, wood products, fuels

Imports - partners

China 18.1%, Japan 11.4%, South Korea 8.7%, US 8%, Thailand 7.1%, Indonesia 6.8%, Singapore 5.9%, Taiwan 5.3% (2016)

China 12.9%, Germany 8.7%, US 5.3%, Italy 4.5%, Turkey 4.3%, Saudi Arabia 4.1% (2016)

Reserves of foreign exchange and gold

$81.53 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$80.69 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 30

$34.02 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$23.2 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 47

Debt - external

$80.88 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$75.01 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 56

$76.31 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$62.38 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 57

Stock of direct foreign investment - at home

$67.25 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$64.25 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 54

$103.6 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$97.14 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 46

Stock of direct foreign investment - abroad

$47.58 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$45.38 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 44

$7.547 billion (31 December 2017 est.)

$7.257 billion (31 December 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 67

Exchange rates

Philippine pesos (PHP) per US dollar -

50.21 (2017 est.)

47.49 (2016 est.)

47.49 (2015 est.)

45.5 (2014 est.)

44.4 (2013 est.)

Egyptian pounds (EGP) per US dollar -

18.05 (2017 est.)

8.8 (2016 est.)

10.07 (2015 est.)

7.71 (2014 est.)

7.08 (2013 est.)

Energy comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Electricity access

population without electricity: 20,600,000

electrification - total population: 88%

electrification - urban areas: 94%

electrification - rural areas: 82% (2013)

population without electricity: 300,000

electrification - total population: 99.6%

electrification - urban areas: 100%

electrification - rural areas: 99.3% (2013)

Electricity - production

90.8 billion kWh (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 37

171.9 billion kWh (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 23

Electricity - consumption

74.15 billion kWh (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 38

150.4 billion kWh (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 24

Electricity - exports

0 kWh (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 188

1.158 billion kWh (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 57

Electricity - imports

0 kWh (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 192

43 million kWh (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 106

Electricity - installed generating capacity

21.21 million kW (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 42

38.88 million kW (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 27

Electricity - from fossil fuels

67.5% of total installed capacity (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 108

90.5% of total installed capacity (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 61

Electricity - from nuclear fuels

0% of total installed capacity (2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 172

0% of total installed capacity (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 82

Electricity - from hydroelectric plants

16.9% of total installed capacity (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 97

7.3% of total installed capacity (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 125

Electricity - from other renewable sources

15.6% of total installed capacity (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 46

2.2% of total installed capacity (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 118

Crude oil - production

20,000 bbl/day (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 69

494,300 bbl/day (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 29

Crude oil - exports

4,942 bbl/day (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 63

197,700 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 31

Crude oil - imports

215,800 bbl/day (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 29

60,940 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 51

Crude oil - proved reserves

138.5 million bbl (1 January 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 68

4.4 billion bbl (1 January 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 27

Refined petroleum products - production

169,000 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 56

471,800 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 35

Refined petroleum products - consumption

390,000 bbl/day (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 38

802,000 bbl/day (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 28

Refined petroleum products - exports

13,140 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 78

39,220 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 57

Refined petroleum products - imports

186,100 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 33

206,100 bbl/day (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 31

Natural gas - production

2.6 billion cu m (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 57

3.61 billion cu m (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 55

Natural gas - consumption

3.196 billion cu m (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 77

77.93 billion cu m (2015 est.)

country comparison to the world: 16

Natural gas - exports

0 cu m (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 171

720 million cu m (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 40

Natural gas - imports

0 cu m (2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 179

2.832 billion cu m (2013 est.)

country comparison to the world: 46

Natural gas - proved reserves

98.54 billion cu m (1 January 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 53

2.186 trillion cu m (1 January 2017 est.)

country comparison to the world: 16

Carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of energy

88 million Mt (2014 est.)

country comparison to the world: 44

207 million Mt (2013 est.)

country comparison to the world: 28

Communications comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Telephones - fixed lines

total subscriptions: 3,835,910.54

subscriptions per 100 inhabitants: 4 (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 40

total subscriptions: 6,118,250

subscriptions per 100 inhabitants: 6 (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 27

Telephones - mobile cellular

total: 113 million

subscriptions per 100 inhabitants: 108 (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 14

total: 97,791,441

subscriptions per 100 inhabitants: 101 (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 17

Telephone system

general assessment: good international radiotelephone and submarine cable services; domestic and interisland service adequate

domestic: telecommunications infrastructure includes the following platforms: fixed line, mobile cellular, cable TV, over-the-air TV, radio and Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT), fiber-optic cable, and satellite for redundant international connectivity

international: country code - 63; a series of submarine cables together provide connectivity to the US, and to countries like Hong Kong, Guam, Singapore, Taiwan, Japan, Brunei, and Malaysia, among others; multiple international gateways (2016)

general assessment: Telecom Egypt remains largely state owned; principal centers at Alexandria, Cairo, Al Mansurah, Ismailia, Suez, and Tanta are connected by coaxial cable and microwave radio relay

domestic: largest fixed-line system in Africa and the Arab region; multiple mobile-cellular networks with a 100-percent penetration of the market

international: country code - 20; landing point for Aletar, the SEA-ME-WE-3 and SEA-ME-WE-4 submarine cable networks, Link Around the Globe (FLAG) Falcon and FLAG FEA; satellite earth stations - 4 (2 Intelsat - Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean, 1 Arabsat, and 1 Inmarsat); tropospheric scatter to Sudan; microwave radio relay to Israel; a participant in Medarabtel (2016)

Broadcast media

multiple national private TV and radio networks; multi-channel satellite and cable TV systems available; more than 400 TV stations; about 1,500 cable TV providers with more than 2 million subscribers, and some 1,400 radio stations; the Philippines adopted Japan’s Integrated Service Digital Broadcast – Terrestrial standard for digital terrestrial television in November 2013 and is scheduled to complete the switch from analog to digital broadcasting by the end of 2023 (2016)

mix of state-run and private broadcast media; state-run TV operates 2 national and 6 regional terrestrial networks, as well as a few satellite channels; dozens of private satellite channels and a large number of Arabic satellite channels are available for free; some limited satellite services are also available via subscription; state-run radio operates about 30 stations belonging to 8 networks (2018)

Internet country code

.ph

.eg

Internet users

total: 56,956,436

percent of population: 55.5% (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 13

total: 37,122,537

percent of population: 39.2% (July 2016 est.)

country comparison to the world: 20

Transportation comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
National air transport system

number of registered air carriers: 11

inventory of registered aircraft operated by air carriers: 158

annual passenger traffic on registered air carriers: 32,230,986

annual freight traffic on registered air carriers: 484,190,968 mt-km (2015)

number of registered air carriers: 14

inventory of registered aircraft operated by air carriers: 101

annual passenger traffic on registered air carriers: 10,159,464

annual freight traffic on registered air carriers: 397,531,535 mt-km (2015)

Civil aircraft registration country code prefix

RP (2016)

SU (2016)

Airports

247 (2013)

country comparison to the world: 24

83 (2013)

country comparison to the world: 66

Airports - with paved runways

total: 89

over 3,047 m: 4

2,438 to 3,047 m: 8

1,524 to 2,437 m: 33

914 to 1,523 m: 34

under 914 m: 10 (2017)

total: 72

over 3,047 m: 15

2,438 to 3,047 m: 36

1,524 to 2,437 m: 15

under 914 m: 6 (2017)

Airports - with unpaved runways

total: 158

1,524 to 2,437 m: 3

914 to 1,523 m: 56

under 914 m: 99 (2013)

total: 11

2,438 to 3,047 m: 1

1,524 to 2,437 m: 3

914 to 1,523 m: 4

under 914 m: 3 (2013)

Heliports

2 (2013)

7 (2013)

Pipelines

gas 530 km; oil 138 km (non-operational); refined products 185 km (2017)

condensate 486 km; condensate/gas 74 km; gas 7,986 km; liquid petroleum gas 957 km; oil 5,225 km; oil/gas/water 37 km; refined products 895 km; water 65 km (2013)

Railways

total: 77 km

narrow gauge: 28 km 1.067-m gauge

standard guage: 49 km 1.435-m guage (2017)

country comparison to the world: 89

total: 5,085 km

standard gauge: 5,085 km 1.435-m gauge (62 km electrified) (2014)

country comparison to the world: 38

Roadways

total: 216,387 km

paved: 61,093 km

unpaved: 155,294 km (2014)

country comparison to the world: 24

total: 137,430 km

paved: 126,742 km (includes 838 km of expressways)

unpaved: 10,688 km (2010)

country comparison to the world: 38

Waterways

3,219 km (limited to vessels with draft less than 1.5 m) (2011)

country comparison to the world: 30

3,500 km (includes the Nile River, Lake Nasser, Alexandria-Cairo Waterway, and numerous smaller canals in Nile Delta; the Suez Canal (193.5 km including approaches) is navigable by oceangoing vessels drawing up to 17.68 m) (2011)

country comparison to the world: 29

Merchant marine

total: 1,508

by type: bulk carrier 64, container ship 33, general cargo 627, oil tanker 184, other 600 (2017)

country comparison to the world: 18

total: 399

by type: bulk carrier 14, container ship 8, general cargo 33, oil tanker 36, other 308 (2017)

country comparison to the world: 46

Ports and terminals

major seaport(s): Batangas, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Liman, Manila

container port(s) (TEUs): Manila (3,976,000) (2015)

major seaport(s): Mediterranean Sea - Alexandria, Damietta, El Dekheila, Port Said; Gulf of Suez - Suez

oil terminal(s): Ain Sukhna terminal, Sidi Kerir terminal

container port(s) (TEUs): Alexandria (1,662,000), Port Said (East) (3,036,000) (2015)

LNG terminal(s) (export): Damietta, Idku (Abu Qir Bay)

Military comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Military expenditures

1.28% of GDP (2016)

1.14% of GDP (2015)

1.09% of GDP (2014)

1.24% of GDP (2013)

1.16% of GDP (2012)

country comparison to the world: 90

2-3% of GDP according to Presisdent ELSISI (March 2017)

1.67% of GDP (2016)

1.72% of GDP (2015)

1.69% of GDP (2014)

1.61% of GDP (2013)

1.65% of GDP (2012)

country comparison to the world: 63

Military branches

Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP): Army, Navy (includes Marine Corps), Air Force (2013)

Army, Navy, Air Force, Air Defense Forces (2018)

Military service age and obligation

17-23 years of age (officers 20-24) for voluntary military service; no conscription; applicants must be single male or female Philippine citizens with either 72 college credit hours (enlisted) or a baccalaureate degree (officers) (2013)

18-30 years of age for male conscript military service; service obligation - 18-36 months, followed by a 9-year reserve obligation; voluntary enlistment possible from age 15 (2017)

Maritime threats

the International Maritime Bureau reports the territorial and offshore waters in the South China Sea as high risk for piracy and armed robbery against ships; during 2016, 10 attacks were reported in and around the Philippines including six ships that were boarded, one hijacked, one fired upon, and 18 crew were kidnapped for ransom; an emerging threat area lies in the Celebes and Sulu Seas between the Philippines and Malaysia where 12 crew were kidnapped in three incidents during the last quarter of 2016; it is believed the pirates involved are associated with the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) terrorist organization; during the first six months of 2017, 13 attacks were reported including 10 ships that were boarded, one was fired upon, 10 crew were kidnapped for ransom and two killed; numerous commercial vessels have been attacked and hijacked both at anchor and while underway; hijacked vessels are often disguised and cargo diverted to ports in East Asia; crews have been murdered or cast adrift

-

Transnational comparison between [Philippines] and [Egypt]

Philippines Egypt
Disputes - international

Philippines claims sovereignty over Scarborough Reef (also claimed by China together with Taiwan) and over certain of the Spratly Islands, known locally as the Kalayaan (Freedom) Islands, also claimed by China, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam; the 2002 "Declaration on the Conduct of Parties in the South China Sea," has eased tensions in the Spratly Islands but falls short of a legally binding "code of conduct" desired by several of the disputants; in March 2005, the national oil companies of China, the Philippines, and Vietnam signed a joint accord to conduct marine seismic activities in the Spratly Islands; Philippines retains a dormant claim to Malaysia's Sabah State in northern Borneo based on the Sultanate of Sulu's granting the Philippines Government power of attorney to pursue a sovereignty claim on his behalf; maritime delimitation negotiations continue with Palau

Sudan claims but Egypt de facto administers security and economic development of Halaib region north of the 22nd parallel boundary; Egypt no longer shows its administration of the Bir Tawil trapezoid in Sudan on its maps; Gazan breaches in the security wall with Egypt in January 2008 highlight difficulties in monitoring the Sinai border; Saudi Arabia claims Egyptian-administered islands of Tiran and Sanafir

Refugees and internally displaced persons

IDPs: 445,000 (government troops fighting the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, the Abu Sayyaf Group, and the New People's Army; clan feuds; natural disasters) (2017)

stateless persons: 4,636 (2016); note - stateless persons are descendants of Indonesian migrants

refugees (country of origin): 70,027 (West Bank and Gaza Strip) (2016); 6,611 (Iraq) (refugees and asylum seekers); 6,561 (Somalia) (refugees and asylum seekers) (2017); 128,507 (Syria) (refugees and asylum seekers); 36,882 (Sudan) (refugees and asylum seekers); 14,850 (Ethiopia) (refugees and asylum seekers); 13,361 (Eritrea) (refugees and asylum seekers); 11,318 (South Sudan) (refugees and asylum seekers) (2018)

IDPs: 82,000 (2017)

stateless persons: 19 (2016)

Illicit drugs

domestic methamphetamine production has been a growing problem in recent years despite government crackdowns; major consumer of amphetamines; longstanding marijuana producer mainly in rural areas where Manila's control is limited

transit point for cannabis, heroin, and opium moving to Europe, Israel, and North Africa; transit stop for Nigerian drug couriers; concern as money laundering site due to lax enforcement of financial regulations

Trafficking in persons -

current situation: Egypt is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor; Egyptian children, including the large population of street children are vulnerable to forced labor in domestic service, begging and agriculture or may be victims of sex trafficking or child sex tourism, which occurs in Cairo, Alexandria, and Luxor; some Egyptian women and girls are sold into “temporary” or “summer” marriages with Gulf men, through the complicity of their parents or marriage brokers, and are exploited for prostitution or forced labor; Egyptian men are subject to forced labor in neighboring countries, while adults from South and Southeast Asia and East Africa – and increasingly Syrian refugees – are forced to work in domestic service, construction, cleaning, and begging in Egypt; women and girls, including migrants and refugees, from Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East are sex trafficked in Egypt; the Egyptian military cracked down on criminal group’s smuggling, abducting, trafficking, and extorting African migrants in the Sinai Peninsula, but the practice has reemerged along Egypt’s western border with Libya

tier rating: Tier 2 Watch List – Egypt does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so; the government gathered data nationwide on trafficking cases to better allocate and prioritize anti-trafficking efforts, but overall it did not demonstrate increased progress; prosecutions increased in 2014, but no offenders were convicted for the second consecutive year; fewer trafficking victims were identified in 2014, which represents a significant and ongoing decrease from the previous two reporting periods; the government relied on NGOs and international organizations to identify and refer victims to protective services, and focused on Egyptian victims and refused to provide some services to foreign victims, at times including shelter (2015)

PHP to EGP Historical Rates

year by month

All PHP Exchange Rates Now

Exchange Rate Exchange Rate Exchange Rate
PHP to AED rate 0.0675 ▼ PHP to ALL rate 1.9247 ▼ PHP to ANG rate 0.03313 ▼
PHP to ARS rate 3.83045 ▼ PHP to AUD rate 0.02751 ▼ PHP to AWG rate 0.0331 ▼
PHP to BBD rate 0.03678 ▼ PHP to BDT rate 1.96455 ▼ PHP to BGN rate 0.03318 ▼
PHP to BHD rate 0.00693 ▼ PHP to BIF rate 38.23373 ▼ PHP to BMD rate 0.01839 ▼
PHP to BND rate 0.02444 ▼ PHP to BOB rate 0.12705 ▼ PHP to BRL rate 0.09444 ▼
PHP to BSD rate 0.01839 ▼ PHP to BTN rate 1.51232 ▼ PHP to BZD rate 0.03706 ▼
PHP to CAD rate 0.02495 ▼ PHP to CHF rate 0.0169 ▼ PHP to CLP rate 14.56652 ▼
PHP to CNY rate 0.12676 ▼ PHP to COP rate 86.18117 ▼ PHP to CRC rate 9.93114 ▼
PHP to CZK rate 0.40001 ▼ PHP to DKK rate 0.12638 ▼ PHP to DOP rate 1.00804 ▼
PHP to DZD rate 2.49566 ▼ PHP to EGP rate 0.56636 ▼ PHP to ETB rate 0.99098 ▼
PHP to EUR rate 0.01697 ▼ PHP to FJD rate 0.04071 ▼ PHP to GBP rate 0.01494 ▼
PHP to GMD rate 1.14289 ▼ PHP to GNF rate 158.59384 ▼ PHP to GTQ rate 0.1433 ▼
PHP to HKD rate 0.14437 ▼ PHP to HNL rate 0.45333 ▼ PHP to HRK rate 0.12784 ▼
PHP to HTG rate 2.85878 ▼ PHP to HUF rate 6.46006 ▼ PHP to IDR rate 276.88597 ▼
PHP to ILS rate 0.06582 ▼ PHP to INR rate 1.51221 ▼ PHP to IQD rate 26.84835 ▼
PHP to IRR rate 777.177 ▼ PHP to ISK rate 2.51271 ▼ PHP to JMD rate 2.77443 ▼
PHP to JOD rate 0.01305 ▼ PHP to JPY rate 2.43841 ▼ PHP to KES rate 2.41654 ▼
PHP to KMF rate 8.35793 ▼ PHP to KRW rate 23.96592 ▼ PHP to KWD rate 0.00564 ▼
PHP to KYD rate 0.01532 ▼ PHP to KZT rate 8.22872 ▼ PHP to LBP rate 278.94333 ▼
PHP to LKR rate 5.97254 ▼ PHP to LSL rate 0.3328 ▼ PHP to MAD rate 0.18816 ▼
PHP to MDL rate 0.33888 ▼ PHP to MKD rate 1.04505 ▼ PHP to MNT rate 62.65164 ▼
PHP to MOP rate 0.14866 ▼ PHP to MUR rate 0.84591 ▼ PHP to MVR rate 0.28365 ▼
PHP to MWK rate 18.83666 ▼ PHP to MXN rate 0.33314 ▼ PHP to MYR rate 0.08139 ▼
PHP to NAD rate 0.33266 ▼ PHP to NGN rate 8.46495 ▼ PHP to NIO rate 0.67248 ▼
PHP to NOK rate 0.19192 ▲ PHP to NPR rate 2.41969 ▼ PHP to NZD rate 0.02958 ▼
PHP to OMR rate 0.00708 ▼ PHP to PAB rate 0.01839 ▼ PHP to PEN rate 0.06916 ▼
PHP to PGK rate 0.06473 ▼ PHP to PKR rate 5.21189 ▼ PHP to PLN rate 0.07956 ▼
PHP to PYG rate 132.05887 ▼ PHP to QAR rate 0.06695 ▼ PHP to RON rate 0.08407 ▼
PHP to RUB rate 1.41794 ▼ PHP to RWF rate 20.23443 ▼ PHP to SAR rate 0.06905 ▼
PHP to SBD rate 0.15202 ▼ PHP to SCR rate 0.24519 ▲ PHP to SEK rate 0.19137 ▼
PHP to SGD rate 0.02446 ▼ PHP to SLL rate 324.84666 ▼ PHP to SVC rate 0.16086 ▼
PHP to SZL rate 0.33269 ▼ PHP to THB rate 0.62983 ▼ PHP to TND rate 0.05618 ▼
PHP to TOP rate 0.0433 ▼ PHP to TRY rate 0.35219 ▼ PHP to TTD rate 0.1248 ▼
PHP to TWD rate 0.56022 ▼ PHP to TZS rate 42.8838 ▼ PHP to UAH rate 0.67898 ▼
PHP to UGX rate 69.68049 ▼ PHP to USD rate 0.01839 ▼ PHP to UYU rate 0.71233 ▼
PHP to VUV rate 2.17074 ▼ PHP to WST rate 0.04961 ▼ PHP to XAF rate 11.12866 ▼
PHP to XCD rate 0.0497 ▼ PHP to XOF rate 11.12866 ▼ PHP to XPF rate 2.02453 ▼
PHP to YER rate 4.60284 ▼ PHP to ZAR rate 0.33335 ▼

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